Elan, a luxury fashion brand, is under fire for failing to deliver items to customers and making improper payments to models, according to a former employee.

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Elan, owned by Khadija Shah, has made news in Pakistan for failing to pay models and ex-employees after they aired their concerns on social media sites.

According to Images, Shah has paid back debts to models and ex-employees who raised the issue on social media. “Yes, the epidemic has been difficult for us,” she stated. I have investigated the case and all outstanding payments have been made.”

There are Numerous Unresolved Complaints

It is not just the models and ex-employees who have suffered as a result of the brand’s irresponsibility; even consumers who have paid thousands of rupees in advance have suffered as a result of their clothing not being delivered.

The Facebook group Voice of Customer is brimming with complaints about Elan’s customer service department, which has failed to address members’ concerns about non-delivery and other related issues. These accusations largely pertain to the non-delivery of Elan’s unstitched collection (each jora is priced between Rs. 10,000 and Rs. 20,000), which often sells out quickly on the company’s website.

We are all aware of the pandemic’s impact on businesses worldwide, and Elan is well aware of the atrocities that have ensued. We sincerely hope Elan reverts to its former character, pays its models and employees, and cherishes its consumers as it did previously.

Khadijah Shah confirms that all payments have been made as Elan faces backlash on social media for failing to pay employees.

Khadijah Shah, the founder of two of Pakistan’s most renowned fashion labels, Elan and Zaha, claims that all outstanding payments to models and former staff have been completed. The firms were thrown into the spotlight following a barrage of social media posts criticizing them for failing to pay employees on time.

“Indeed, the epidemic has been really difficult for us […] When contacted by Images, Shah said that he had looked into the problem and that all outstanding payments had been made.

Social media profiles

Shah is widely regarded as one of the country’s most successful creative forces and is frequently lauded for her innovations in bridal design, ready-to-wear, and unstitched fabric, but her brands were discussed on social media on Wednesday and Thursday for their business practices rather than their fashion.

On Wednesday, model Atikah Gardezi shared a photo of herself from a previous Zaha ad with the message, “Mere paise kidher hain?” Zaha” [Where have you taken my money, Zaha?]

She later updated her followers in the comments area, stating that the companies’ management had contacted her to advise her that they would transfer the payment and asked her to erase the article. She intended to delete the post after receiving the cash, which she stated she would then donate to charity. Gardezi updated her post on Thursday evening to indicate that she had been compensated.

Abeera Riaz, the model who initially took to her Instagram stories to address the problem, stated on social media that while she was embarrassed to defame the company, she was forced to do so. “It is not solely about money,” she explains. “It’s about being impolite. Why should I beg for money that is legitimately mine? What happened to brand ethics?”

Mydah Raza, another model, indicated that Elan and Zaha had not paid her in three years and that she knew a lot of women who were “in the same position” and should “stand up as well.” “We’ve been a touch too patient,” she wrote. “[…] To book them and then make them wait months/years for what you owe them is reprehensible.”

Additionally, Hasan Iqbal Rizvi, an ex-employee, came out via his Instagram stories. He then stated on social media that he had got his awaiting cash.

Elan’s version of Story

Naturally, Shah is enraged by the social media uproar. “Of course, it is unacceptable that these individuals were not compensated. I apologize profusely. However, the company has been through significant changes, and it has been difficult at times to keep up,” she told Images.

“Our accounting and marketing divisions have experienced worker changes. We had significant growth before the pandemic and then faced significant liabilities due to the lockdown. We’ve been incredibly stretched over the last two years, and maintaining it all has been a balancing act,” she explained.

“However, both of my brands have always been committed to assisting the fashion sector. We do not expect models to labor for free when so many other brands do so under the guise of generating mileage for the models. I have indeed handpicked promising young models, and several have had very successful careers after appearing in my advertisements. “I’ve backed bloggers, filmmakers, photographers, and stylists,” the designer said.

“However, the pandemic has been challenging for us. It’s difficult to keep afloat during these trying times. I have investigated the situation, and all outstanding payments have been made. Unfortunately, certain individuals who have never worked with my brands have chosen to remark on the situation on social media,” she continued.

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